White House Insults Nation’s Intelligence by Pretending Obamacare Enrollment Goal Never Existed

White House Insults Nation’s Intelligence by Pretending Obamacare Enrollment Goal Never Existed

The widely circulated figure of 7 million – a figure which has been cited and repeated regularly by the press and members of the administration, was never their number, Schiliro asserted. “That was never our target number,” he insisted. Washington Times reporter David Sherfinski notes that Sebelius said “7 million is a realistic target” in […] more…
New type of audio malware transmits through speakers and microphones

New type of audio malware transmits through speakers and microphones

  A few weeks ago, security researcher Dragos Ruiu publicly claimed that computers in his lab were being infected by some sort of stealthy over-the-air transmission method that relied on ordinary speakers and microphones to transmit the malware payload from system to system. Ruiu nicknamed this bug “badBIOS,” and research into its existence (or lack […] more…
‘The Sopranos,’ ‘Walking Dead,’ and the end of TV’s Golden Age

‘The Sopranos,’ ‘Walking Dead,’ and the end of TV’s Golden Age

“It’s good to be in something from the ground floor. I came too late for that and I know. But lately, I’m getting the feeling that I came in at the end. The best is over.” Tony Soprano said these words in 1999, midway through the pilot of The Sopranos. He was right about his […] more…
Palm-Size Drones Buzz Over Battlefield

Palm-Size Drones Buzz Over Battlefield

  Weighing only 0.56 ounces (16 grams), the Black Hornet looks like a tiny toy helicopter. But it’s really a nano-size piece of military hardware unlike anything on the battlefield today — experimental robot flies and hummingbirds not withstanding. The PD-100 Black Hornet Personal Reconnaissance System, unveiled to the American public for the first time […] more…
The Scientifically Best Times To Drink Coffee During The Day

The Scientifically Best Times To Drink Coffee During The Day

Why you should treat caffeine the way you treat painkillers or antibiotics When’s the optimal time to get your coffee kick? Sometime between 9:30 and 11:30 in the morning should work well, neuroscience doctoral student Steven Miller explains in a supremely helpful blog post. See full story on popsci.com more…
The Endangered Author – a species under threat, for good and for bad.

The Endangered Author – a species under threat, for good and for bad.

Dealing with the audience, what we learnt was that if the content we provided was good enough, and if we managed to give clear enough instructions that at the same time were enticing enough, the audience wanted to interact. It could’ve been just to comment, it could’ve been to add to the narrative in one […] more…
A mysterious fire transformed North America’s greatest city in 1170

A mysterious fire transformed North America’s greatest city in 1170

One thousand years ago, in the place where St. Louis, Missouri now stands, there was once a great civilization whose city center was ringed with enormous earthen pyramids, vast farmlands, and wealthy suburbs. For hundreds of years it was the biggest city in North America. Shaped much like the stone pyramids of the Maya civilization […] more…
Neuroscientists plant false memories in the brain

Neuroscientists plant false memories in the brain

The phenomenon of false memory has been well-documented: In many court cases, defendants have been found guilty based on testimony from witnesses and victims who were sure of their recollections, but DNA evidence later overturned the conviction. In a step toward understanding how these faulty memories arise, MIT neuroscientists have shown that they can plant […] more…
We have always been modern, and it has often scared us

We have always been modern, and it has often scared us

Fears about the effect of new technologies on impressionable minds are much older than this boy or his tablet. Photograph: Jekaterina Nikitina/Getty Images The idea that our world and even our minds are being made radically different by new technologies, above all the internet and social media, is everywhere. There are shades here of Susan […] more…
The Science Of How Applause Spreads In An Audience

The Science Of How Applause Spreads In An Audience

When people clap at a performance, they’re not really driven by how much they enjoyed what they saw, according to a new study. Instead, they decide how long to applaud based on the applause they hear around them. The research is part of a larger field in which scientists try to figure out how memes […] more…
Fruits And Veggies Are Alive, Can Defend Against Herbivores

Fruits And Veggies Are Alive, Can Defend Against Herbivores

A study published online today in the journal Current Biology found that store-bought cabbage, lettuce, spinach, zucchini, sweet potatoes, carrots, and blueberries respond to light-dark cycles up to about a week after harvest. Part of the mustard family, Arabidopsis is related to produce including cabbage, broccoli, and cauliflower. So the researchers decided to see if they could […] more…
Why Monopolies Make Government Spying Easier

Why Monopolies Make Government Spying Easier

  These days, America has one dominant search engine, one dominant social-networking site, and four phone companies. The structure of the information industry often goes unnoticed, but it has an enormous effect on the ease with which the government spies on citizens. The remarkable consolidation of the communications and Web industries into a handful of […] more…
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