Tag Archives: content creation

7 Spot On Reasons to Engage in Content Curation

KTPost originally titled their article “7 Excuses for content curation” but I don’t think you need an excuse to implement content curation. The 7 tips they provide are more than just excuses they are high value reasons to start curating right now. One important point to make is you should be curating first on your own platform.

We’ve all grown up learning that “sharing is caring,” and when it comes to content marketing, it’s no different. Content curation isn’t just a great way to jump-start and maintain relationships with prospects and experts in your industry, it can also save you time and find new inspiration. There’s no question that publishing original content is the ideal way to start building a distinct voice for your brand’s personality. However, curating content can serve to supplement those efforts and solidify the identity that you’re working to create.

1. Take Some Pressure Off Your Content Creation
2. Get Inspiration For Your Next Blog Post Or Infographic
3. Discover Potential Business Opportunities
4. Connect To And Interview Thought Leaders
5. Stay On Top Of Industry News And Trends
6. Show Love To Thy Neighbor
7. Establish Your Brands Credibility

7 Great Excuses for Curating Content

A few general thoughts on all these tips…

Sure content curation can take pressure off content creation but in the end curation contains a fair amount of creation if you’re doing it right.

One of the other interesting things you learn when curating is that it will inspire you to create like content. The act of curating really provides a fresh new set of ideas, concepts, and perspectives for you to write about.

The other tips really are good by products of curation. As you curate you begin to further understand  your market, the people in it, the thought leaders, and other market participants.

If You Can’t Be a Creator, Then Be a Curator

A really good point made here. Google has upped the ante for quality content and because of this it’s important that you have an ongoing content strategy. It’s also important that your site stays fresh and curates reliable sources.

There’s an important point to be made here about content creation. I think curation is a perfect strategy to test out if you can keep a schedule that would be required for true creation.

The other thing that curation does for you is it helps you get a good feel of the market. As you curate for a while you’ll start to see trends and opportunities for your own unique content.

After Google raised the standards for quality content with the Panda Update and integrated social with search, the message was delivered loud and clear to thesearch industry: only quality content can help your website sustain its search presence. This has grown the demand for content writers.

Will content published just for the sake of adding words via blog posts suffice and help your web presence survive? No.

On the World Wide Web it’s the survival of the fittest. Your blog content has to face this Darwinian test and prove that the content meets the quality standards of Google and is worth sharing.

Oliver Starr on Content Marketing with Content Curation

There’s a good but short interview from Oliver Starr of Pearltrees on Search Engine Journal:

There’s no doubt that content creation and content marketing will play an integral role in the marketing strategies of most brands in 2014, but what you probably didn’t know is that content curation can be an equally successful venture. If you’re struggling with creating original, unique, or shareable content, then content curation can be a perfect alternative. With these great tips from Oliver Starr, Chief Evangelist for Pearltrees and one of the earliest contributors to Techcrunch, you’ll be well on your way to becoming a content-curating master.

He mentions something that really defines the core of an effective curation strategy:

A great curated collection is not one that has everything, but one that has been honed to a fine edge.

Essentially a good curation isn’t a collection of everything you can find– it’s a collection of the best things you can find… click below to read more.

Photo Credit: Thanya Starr

content curation king

Is Content Curation King?

 

In this episode we’ll talk about, is content curation king? We’ve heard this – I’ve heard this phrase quite a bit, specifically around content marketing. I see it a lot, is content marketing king, but we’ll talk about is curation king? Or is it the queen, or is it the prince, or is it the peasant. So let’s jump right in.

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What is a King in the Content Marketing Game?

When we think about this, something being king, right? That means it’s the top of the heap. It’s the ultimate ruler. It’s the thing you should really focus on. And a lot of, I guess, when I hear this phrase, especially around content marketing, I always wonder, why do we have to place this strategy above all else? Because increasingly today – and this is something probably that will go beyond curation. 

Be it social, your blog, other content platforms, any other platform that’s is coming up. Mobile, tablets, you know however people want to interact with you, your brand, your company, you have to be to interact with them in those platforms, right?

Content vs Curation

So when we talk about content versus curation and whether one or the other is the king, I think we have to really dial it back a little bit and say that all forms of marketing is in the kingdom so to say. Is in the castle. And is content, the act of creating content to connect with your target market, be it if you are a B2B – business to business marketer, or a B2C – business to consumer marketer, does content play a role? Yes. Because if you are engaging in social media, you can always curate stuff and curate stuff from other sources, but ultimately that’s someone else’s idea, that’s someone else’s product, it’s always better to be able to find ways to connect your product and to curate, to create stuff around your product I should say.

Is Curation on a Higher Level?

So, I don’t think curation is on a higher level. In some forms, curation is kind of like the prince. Not the queen. Cause I don’t know what the queen does. It depends on each dynasty obviously, some queens are more powerful than others. But I think that curation is more like a prince. And what I mean by that is you’ve got content marketing, which is creating content, creating unique content, is really a lot of times the driving source and what really creates authority and creates persuasion with your marketing.

Is Content Curation King?

But when you add curation onto that and let’s say the prince, the prince if you think about it, typically if you’ve got a very strong king that has accomplished a lot, the prince is always trying to find ways that he can live up to the name of the king. Live up to the accomplishments of the king. And that’s really where curation is placed, because curation, in it’s essence is a great strategy if you’re just getting started. It’s a great strategy to capture traffic. It’s a great strategy if you’re a content marketer to add on top of. Especially if you own the platform.

But, it will never, unless you – and I will add a caveat to this – curation will dominate the king, will essentially assassinate the king and become king if you do a really good job of it and you become a platform that is known to curate the best in your market. Then, a lot of times it will become king. You look at the way The Huffington Post got to it’s rise. Now they are obviously focusing a lot on unique content, but a lot of it was curated content, aggregated content.

Curation Platform Examples

Techmeme is another good example, that’s a straight curation platform. They don’t do any unique content. BuzzFeed is another good example. BuzzFeed started just curating stuff and even now they do a lot of curation but they are starting with unique content.

So you can do it but you have to do it in a very focused fashion and so the prince, in some ways, can outshine the king, but that prince better be good and better be ruthless, and eventually that prince will have to adopt the strategies of a king. And I believe if you do look at this – if we want to use this kind of analogy – content creation, when done right with a voice, with authority, with heart, with a why, always will win out above curation, because it’s your own ideas. It’s something people can connect with. It’s an emotional aspect done right.

Ultimately You’re Citing External Sources

Curation, ultimately you’re always pulling from someone else’s source. I still feel, even if you’ve mastered content marketing, you’ve master creation, you’ll notice everybody who has, they still curate. And they still curate on their own platform because it’s more traffic. It’s more eyeballs on their stuff. And in some aspects, when you get known as a content marketer, as a person who can create content I should say, and you put the strategy of curation on top if that, you’ve built authority, ultimately you’re looking for more eyeballs. You’re looking for more traffic. And that’s what curation delivers to you.

So that’s another interesting aspect to this.

So is content curation king? No, I don’t even think its queen. Possibly it’s a prince. I definitely don’t think it’s a peasant. But it’s somewhere in the upper echelons of the court – the king and queen’s court. So it’s somewhere in there.

And I’ll say one other thing, if you’re new to the show, if you’re new to curation, number one if you’re new to content, start with curation. Because it teaches you how to be a good content marketer. So I would suggest start with curation. We have a tool called Curation Traffic that allows you to really easily do that.

Aren’t You Already Doing Curation?

If you are a content marketer, I would suggest add curation to what you are doing if you are not already doing it. You probably already are in social media, but add it on a platform that you own, that you control, that you can monetize right away. That to me takes your audience, your authority and in some ways can double or triple the existing engagement you get right now. So that’s something that I would suggest.

That’s all for this episode. Look you can subscribe to this show in iTunes. You can definitely subscribe on YouTube if you are watching this on YouTube. Or if you are on our website CurationTraffic you can go to the blog section and see all the podcast episodes. You can follow me on Twitter at Scott Scanlon, and you can follow us on – you’ll see all the other social accounts, so that’s all for this episode. I look forward to seeing you on the next show.

7 Rules for a Strong Digital Content Strategy

These are some great rules for a digital content strategy but also the foundation of a good content curation strategy as well.

When it comes to crafting a digital content strategy for your business, think about these 7 rules.  What other rules do you think are crucial in ensuring a successful digital content strategy?

Rule #1: Focus on your Customer First

Rule #2:  Be Consistent

Rule #3:  Get Out of Your Comfort Zone – Be Creative

Rule #4:  Communicate

Rule #5:  Create Unique Content

Rule #6:  Curate Select Content

Rule #7:  Collaborate with Customers

#1 – I’d add when thinking about your customer it’s important that the content you curate solves problems or gives them consistent breakthroughs.

#2 – One of the biggest reasons I see people fail in any marketing strategy is not being consistent. When starting create and plan a way to stay consistent.

#3 – This is big, challenge yourself to curate from sources you never though imaginable. How do you do that? By finding related topics and sharing how the tips or insight relates to your industry or niche.

#4 – Don’t stay in your hole, get out and interact with your market.

#5 – I’ve said this many times but curation drives unique content creation. After you’ve curated for any amount of time you start to see trends yourself, you also start to have additional ideas.

#6 – Have to agree there.

#7 – If you’re in a market where you have customers who create content this is a huge win-win. Curate their content or find ways you can work together to either create some unique content or think of ways you help each other spread your reach. We do this with our site by having exclusive membership tribes with Curation Traffic.

That’s all just wanted to add some additional thoughts to the article, you can see the original source down below. BTW this post was curated with the Curation Traffic Plugin.

 

Is Content Curation an Ethical Content Strategy?

The question over the ethics involved with content curation is not a new debate. It’s been going on for years, and I expect it to go on for years to come. Regardless of that continuing debate, one thing is certain; it’s a strategy that content marketers will continue to use and explore. But can they do it with a clear conscience? My answer is, yes, if you follow some straightforward, ethical guidelines that start with understanding what content curation is and what it is not.

“I Once Heard a Story About…”

So, what is content curation? Well, have you ever heard someone tell a story that wasn’t their own? We do it all the time. The stories that other people share about their own experiences can be powerful illustrations to back our own viewpoint or experience. There is nothing wrong with that. Everyone does it. Many instances in history and media support the practice. And, as long as credit is given where credit is due, it’s a legitimate tool.

Content curation does a similar thing. A content curator borrows a story or idea from someone else and presents it in a way that highlights a point that the curator believes is important.

curation and stories pull quote

Done in this way, proper content curation is ethical. In fact, when done well, it is appreciated by readers and content producers alike.

Curation is not piracy. Unlike content curation, pirating is illegal and can get you into some serious legal trouble. And, unfortunately for those who find themselves mixed up in it, the legal problems are not the only major dilemma they bring on themselves. Their reputation is also likely to suffer, and in the land of internet marketing, reputation is everything.

Pirating VS Curating Content

So, what’s the difference between curating content and pirating? How can you be sure that what you do remains under the label of curation and doesn’t cross over to pirating? Well, though the two may seem very similar, where ethics are concerned, they are actually vastly different.

Pirating is stealing. It describes taking content word for word or concept for concept, whole or in part, and publishing it. There’s no other way to put this—it is simply wrong.

Content curation, on the other hand, is not stealing. It is ethical because it involves only using carefully selected parts of the content, adding relevant commentary or insight, or highlighting specific parts of it, and always assigning credit to the content’s originator. In other words, you add to the discussion involving the content.

The difference is not even subtle; pirating is stealing and it is unethical. This includes article spinning, where words or ideas are stolen from somewhere and changed just enough to make it appear to be original content. It rarely does appear to be original, which hurts the reputation of those who practice article spinning. Not only is it clear that they are practicing piracy by stealing the original content, but they are also taking efforts to cover that fact; something that is not held in high esteem by many people, including the search engines who may block such content.

Content curation, on the other hand, is not done in the shadows of the digital marketplace. It is an honest endeavor that adds value, offers fresh perspectives, and enhances the ecosystem of ideas that is the digital landscape.

So is Curation Unethical?

Because it does get confused with piracy, I think that an end to this debate is still a ways off. Some content producers will always have a strong reaction when they see their content curated. Some appreciated it; others do not. I believe, however, that the digital world has evolved enough that this is no longer a question about whether content curation is an ethical strategy. I believe it is more about whether you are doing it right. If you are, then, in my book, you’re in the clear.

I also have a follow up post here shortly discussing the traffic issue in curation, so stay tuned for that.

Doing it right image by bigboy.

Google’s Matt Cutts: Create, Curate, Don’t Aggregate

Here’s another really good post launched by some advice from Matt Cutts from Google. It answers a few questions we get often… which should I focus on creation or curation? Also, what is the difference between curation and aggregation. One outlier in the aggregation space would be TechMeme.com. If you could employ a similar model then I think aggregation is a great strategy. Short of that it’s probably best avoided. Here’s more from this piece:

Matt mistakenly refers to content creation as content curation, and refers to aggregated content as auto-generated content. In the course of his explanation, he wholly ignores curated content. Below I have attempted to clarify his explanation along with clear distinctions between aggregated content, curated content and created content. Be cautious with aggregated content.

  1. Don’t repost full articles.
  2. Create content as much as possible.
  3. Consider content curation.
  4. Add value to your curated content.

Content Curation: Advocates, Influencers and Relevance

 

 

The benefits of curation go way beyond just driving traffic and conversions. Often some of the best things you discover as you curate is greater insight into your market. That’s talked about in the piece here that we highlight. Specifically as a brand knowing your audience is key.

We see this often with new curators. It happens slowly at first but after a bit of time they become more in tune with the market. They start to see trends, opportunities, and make connections like never before.

The post that follows dives in a little deeper giving some great examples of how this actually does play out:

The success ofFlipboard, Paper.li and Scoop.it can be attributed to topic filtering and content aggregation. With the recent Linkedin acquisition of RSS visualizer Pulse.me for $90MM visual content access has never been hotter. Tumblr which was recently purchased for a massive $1.1B is in may ways a curation platform. Combining the social graph of friends’ Facebook and Twitter connections to determine what content is trending and advance interface design the renaissance of intelligent content consumption is on.The overall success of social news generation depends heavily on quality content creation and brands are doing every thing to leverage content marketing as the new ad wooing customers to engage.