Tag Archives: owning the platform

If You Want to Profit with Content Curation You Must Own the Platform

Content curation is an awesome strategy. It is a low risk, big impact marketing tactic that has the ability to convert like crazy when put into action. In order for you to use it as an effective conversion tool for you or your business, however, when it comes to monetizing the curated content, the only thing that really matters is:

YOU MUST CONTROL THE CLICK.

Well, okay, other stuff does still matter. It is important to be a good curator and build trust and authority. These things are of prime importance in order to achieve the traffic you are looking for. But once the traffic is there, whoever controls the click ultimately determines where that traffic goes.

So, for this post, I want to ask you to join me in this bubble of thought where the only thing that matters is where the click goes, be that on a link, a product, or wherever you intend to direct the traffic. Regardless of how the user found the content, where that click goes, and who controls it, is what is most important. Continue reading

7 Spot On Reasons to Engage in Content Curation

KTPost originally titled their article “7 Excuses for content curation” but I don’t think you need an excuse to implement content curation. The 7 tips they provide are more than just excuses they are high value reasons to start curating right now. One important point to make is you should be curating first on your own platform.

We’ve all grown up learning that “sharing is caring,” and when it comes to content marketing, it’s no different. Content curation isn’t just a great way to jump-start and maintain relationships with prospects and experts in your industry, it can also save you time and find new inspiration. There’s no question that publishing original content is the ideal way to start building a distinct voice for your brand’s personality. However, curating content can serve to supplement those efforts and solidify the identity that you’re working to create.

1. Take Some Pressure Off Your Content Creation
2. Get Inspiration For Your Next Blog Post Or Infographic
3. Discover Potential Business Opportunities
4. Connect To And Interview Thought Leaders
5. Stay On Top Of Industry News And Trends
6. Show Love To Thy Neighbor
7. Establish Your Brands Credibility

7 Great Excuses for Curating Content

A few general thoughts on all these tips…

Sure content curation can take pressure off content creation but in the end curation contains a fair amount of creation if you’re doing it right.

One of the other interesting things you learn when curating is that it will inspire you to create like content. The act of curating really provides a fresh new set of ideas, concepts, and perspectives for you to write about.

The other tips really are good by products of curation. As you curate you begin to further understand  your market, the people in it, the thought leaders, and other market participants.

Content Curation – How to Find the Right Ingredients [Infographic]

Content has been the buzzword for awhile now and businesses of all sizes are in a race to figure out how to create the content their customers want. One way to avoid building all your content from scratch is to curate or aggregate — i.e., collect — relevant, high-quality content that other people have already created.

Here’s a few things missing from this infographic:

  • Consistency – content curation pays off the more  you keep to it and the more consistent you are with your efforts.
  • Owning the platform – without owning the platform you’re giving up huge amount of conversions.
  • Listening platform – while the infographic talks about it it’s actually one of the most important parts of a successful content marketing plan.

 

How Does Content Curation Work?

In this episode we talk about how does content curation work? Exactly what is the process that you follow to curate content?

In some ways we all curate given how we share things with social media, share things with our friends, co-workers, and family via email. But today we talk more about employing content curation as an inbound strategy.

There really are 5 core steps to how curation works:

  1. Decide what you want to be known for.
  2. Find your sources
  3. Curate and add commentary
  4. Publish your curated piece of content
  5. Promote

Let’s break down each one of those with a little bit more detail.

Here’s the Details on How Content Curation Works

The first step is decide what you (or your company) should be known for. What type of concepts, ideas, thoughts, and content do you want associated with? What type of things would you target market care about?

This is probably one of the most important steps because when you define what you want to be known for you set the right foundation for curation success.

Finding Sources

We’ve said this before and we will probably say it again. Your sources are gold. You want to be able to consistently find sources that your target market and the people that follow you will appreciate. That means you don’t curate content that everybody else is sharing or curating. We talk a little bit about this in the Horizontal Content Curation
.

We suggest you also set up a listening platform, like the one we describe in Using RSS Feeds with Content Curation.

Curate and Add Commentary

Once you’ve identified  your sources your next step is to find great stuff to share. That’s when you really want to curate and add your own thoughts.

There’s 2 ways of thinking on this. First, you can expand on the original idea or ideas from your curated piece of content. The other option is to back up your reason or share you reason for curating this particular piece of content. You might even use both of these strategies on one curation but generally your doing one or the other.

Publish Your Curated Content

This part is important and we talk a little bit about it in the episode. The main point I would bring up here is it’s important that you own the platform. Without owning the platform the the question of “How Does Content Curation Work” breaks down a bit.

That’s because curation in my mind only works when you can monetize right away. Sure there’s an aspect of building authority and trust but ultimately I like strategies (and marketing) where I can monetize the traffic and attention immediately. The post I reference above has more information on this concept.

Promote

It’s not just enough to find, curate, and publish. Your next step is to consistently promote your curated site and your curations. This is really where the traffic opportunity comes into play. First there is the immediate benefit of sharing your curations but if you take a long term approach something else happens as well.

People will start to follow your curated site and content. That’s where the authority and trust comes into play. But if you don’t promote on a ongoing basis then the strategy of curation really will never pay off. Ultimately you have to get people to see your stuff so you can gain awareness, grow your permission channels or create sales.

Ultimately following these steps is how content curation works. That’s all for a recap but we cover all these topics in much more detail in today’s episode.

Content Curation Tools -(Podcast)

Content Curation Tools

Selecting your tools can be tricky.

Selecting your tools can be tricky.

Today we’ll talk about Content Curation Tools.

Say that you’ve actually said hey content Curation is a strategy I want to employ for myself or my business.   Now I just need to know what kinds of tools exist. What are your options for Content Curation? That is what we will talk about today.

Well this is a subject we know a lot about because we created a tool called Curation Traffic and why we created that tool is we couldn’t find something that was push-button simple.

We have deep experience with Content Curation tools and when we talk about tools that there’s a couple things to keep in mind will talk about at a high level going to detail.

There is so that is really two buckets of tools :

  • Hosted Platforms – your curating content is hosted by them it’s on their platform and I it’s not something you can easily control
  • Owning the Platforms – this is a platform you control and you own the leads, can monetize the traffic and you decide which tools run your curation strategy

Hosted Platforms  Curating-Social-Sharing

In essence you could say that Facebook is a great Curation tool it allows you to build an audience and easily add content there and build trust with them. The challenge with Facebook is that you can’t really control your monetization.

If you think about it, there is other things trying to get your audience’s attention their, Facebook has its own ads as well, so when you look at the value of and monetizing engaging people on Facebook as a Curation platform you get so many mixed messages how can you really monetize with that? And that to me is really the essence of Content Curation. You’re doing this for a purpose.

Most people want to spread their brand, their idea, their business, their products or they want to build a separate niche site to monetize.

Now you could say that those social media sites like Pinterest and Instagram are Curation platforms  but

I want to talk more specifically about a popular tool out there, a tool we like to use called Scoop.it.

 

Scoop.it is a Hosted Platform:

  • Hosted Platform (You Do Not Own It)
  • Limited Monetization Options
  • Limited Design Elements

I created a podcast called the Defining New Media and I started the podcast because I was new to podcasting on a hosted platform and that allowed me to get up and get up and running like within 10 min.

I had a site. I had all the feed set-up, iTunes set-up, all I did was upload a logo, Small Description and all that was left to release my show, was just to upload a blog post in the MP3 and everything worked.

Everything was hunky dory until three or four months down the road.

I decided I wanted to actually begin monetizing as I was starting to have more success and see an increase in subscribers, But it became a huge challenge to monetize.

Owning the Platforms

It doesn't need to be the one in the subway though.

It doesn’t need to be the one in the subway though.

I really didn’t have total control of the stuff I was creating and that was a huge problem for me to take and tackle.

What I had created and transferred over from Defining New Media to a platform that I controlled was independence. So I can actually monetize and set it up as my original intent was at conception and run my owned ads and set-up shop as I wanted to.

Why I wanted to set it up and in the lesson I would take that is the same way with Content Curation.

You can get started on these Curation tools and they provide the ability for free to going airing user tools and another benefit is that it has a community sometimes the you can easily reach additional people but the challenge is your building something on someone else’s platform.

On Your own platform you have the ability to craft and design your own messaging and evolve your messaging to develop and grow with your market.

Content Discovery Tools

The Secret Sauce Behind Content Discovery is You, as a person, we have yet to find a machine that can help us find great stuff you should be sharing. A lot of this is great stuff that isn’t always directly relatable to your marketing niche quite directly.

Examples often rise in the form of marketing storytelling and it is often one of the most powerful things you can do.

So a lot of times we curate stuff around storytelling that is from writing or from writing in websites, on writing about certain characters around character development and plot development and related to how you can employ this in marketing that’s an important aspect. I don’t know any content discovery tool that allows me to like say and we tested them all to say I want to build a subset of writing type of websites and related to marketing that the human that’s the best thinking that the human element brings. So we use a series of RSS feeds newsletter feeds different tools so that we can be kind of the curator and that’s our content discovery week, Re: self-selected our sources so and I as say this because we’ve been curating seriously one I mean seriously all of our clients curate all of our clients use our platform in a series other platforms but we’ve been curating and using it as a strategy ongoing for the last couple years and we tested just about any listening platform out there and we’ve yet to find one that that saves us time above us just creating a series of really simple systems that we tap into that allow you to curate quickly but this so that we cover in our training but that it’s I guess I am on sharing that here in the curate and tools because that’s one of the benefits that constantly comes up with the tools.

it’s also another reason why Curation Traffic, We have not built a listening platform or content discovery tools into our platform because we teach effective Content Curation and it’s very hard I think to create a discovery platform that allows you to do effective Content Curation we are just not Parroting the market. Thus finding great stuff and commenting on it with depth and resourcefulness and length will be rewarded. Look outside the box and what is trending and popular is often the opposite of what you should be spending your time curating. Look at tools that allow you to own the platform for your tools and develop a great readership of newsletters and filters and RSS that is quick and easily available for you to digest and turn into great curated content.

Yet More Proof Why You Must Own the Platform

One thing we talk a ton about in our training and on the podcast is that you must own the platform. Owning the platform means that you own the assets, content, commentary, and ultimately the website (platform) of your curations. A recent development from a curation platform named Clipboard shows why you shouldn’t trust these other sites with your curating efforts.

First here’s the good news for the team at Clipboard via the FAQ:

Salesforce.com has signed a definitive agreement to acquire Clipboard. The Clipboard service at clipboard.com (along with all of its associated apps and extensions) will be discontinued on June 30, 2013. Until the final day of service, existing users of Clipboard will be able to export their clips for offline use.

Which basically says, hey users, thanks for using our site, trusting us with your time and effort, cya. Good for the team at Clipboard but I also feel for the users. In a post titled Farewell the founder thanked everybody involved but it’s the comments from some of the users really do back up the point we’ve made.

Here’s a pretty harsh one:

I guess the name “Flake” is apropos… thanks for nothing… what a waste of my time… im rooting for zoho… I hope the money is good now because people will remember this experience the next time any of you have your names attached to anything

and another one

Thanks for wasting my time……..

Just admit to us all that all you ever wanted was to be bought out by another company and move on to something else!

Or what if you came from another service that shut down:

Are you kidding me?? Oh no!!!

I found you and LOVED YOU and raved to all my friends about the ability to have all these PRIVATE boards and clips … and so easy too! I had moved from ANOTHER company who closed down shop on us all and was so HAPPY to have found clipboard. . How about giving us the ability to move all our stuff to a new service? Or at least giving us some alternative companies to try? Oh wait ..that’s right .. you got what you wanted and now we (the loyal followers of clipboard, who made you what you are) are now left out in the rain. Congrats! Happy for you … celebrate! Somehow I feel like a fool ….

I’m not faulting the Clipboard team or Saleforce in this move, after all this is the reality of the world we live in. But it’s also why you should think twice if you are building or relying on any service that you’re putting any amount of time or effort in (and you don’t own it). Really you should consider what happens if it goes away? Ultimately, that’s why we suggest you must own the platform.