Tag Archives: sports

Top Curation News From Last Week

Here’s some of the top news on curation from the last week:

Medium launches on iOS as read-only app focused on content curation

Unlike its Web counterpart, Medium for iOS is read-only, making it more of a consumption app than a tool for production. Instead, the app plies Medium’s clean and easy-to-use user interface to mobile content aggregation and discovery. After signing in with a Twitter account — unsurprising given Medium is the brainchild of Twitter’s Ev Williams — the app pulls from stories trending on the Medium website, new content from a user’s followed writers and new additions to a user’s subscription list. Medium launches on iOS as read-only app focused on content curation

Great curated content not to be underestimated

Wading through the content clutter to discover gems so that users don’t have to, is a valuable service brands can and should offer their community. If content is king, then valuable content is the emperor. Hopping online is like disappearing down a rabbit hole only to get lost in a kingdom of content created by any citizen with an internet connection. Read more…

Personality driven sites bring Pandora approach to sports journalism

This week saw the long-awaited launch of Nate Silver’s FiveThirtyEight as a part of ESPN, adding to that company’s investment in personality-branded sites. They already have Grantland, led by and based around Bill Simmons, and they’re reportedly working on another site led by and based around relatively-recent hire Jason Whitlock.

Bristol isn’t the only company following this approach, though; in the sports world, Sports Illustrated has followed suit with the Peter King-based The MMQB, and outside it, everyone from Ezra Klein to Glenn Greenwald is doing similar things. There’s been plenty written about what this personality-based portal movement means for these “brand journalists” and why this landscape is more difficult for the Rick Reillys of the world, but an under-explored topic is why this approach seems to be working for many companies—and why it draws readers. Personality driven sites bring Pandora approach to sports journalism

How Klout Is Poised to Clean LinkedIn’s Content Clock

Last month Klout announced its intent to empower its users with the ability to view and share curated content that is custom-tailored according to the social graph of the user and the user’s audience. This is a throwback to early last year when LinkedIn actually did something similar — when its content was still useful. However, since curation is based on an individual user’s social graph and what actually resonates with their audience, this looks to be potentially better. Klout describes it this way:

The ‘Create’ tab helps you find great articles and posts worth sharing with your audience. Unlike most apps that suggest content for your personal consumption, Klout intelligently recommends content that will strike a chord with your unique set of friends, fans and followers. Helpful tags highlight fresh content that is starting to trend as well as items that closely match the interests of your audience members and are likely to resonate with them. How Klout Is Poised to Clean LinkedIn’s Content Clock|Chad Pollitt

If Steam Starts Curating Games, Then What’s The Point Of Game Reviewers?

Now I know there are some people who will instantly drop to the comment section to decry the title, make excuses and go on and about the necessity of the current setup of the video game market, but I do at least implore you to watch the video first before making any snap judgments. John Bain, a.k.a., TotalBiscuit, brings up some interesting points about “fixing” or “cleaning” up the Steam store. One of the the key points brought up in the video, however, is about content curation: what deserves and does not deserve to be on the Steam store? If Steam Starts Curating Games, Then What’s The Point Of Game Reviewers?